Quotes

“Thank you. I’ve never won anything in my life.” – on winning her 2000 Golden Globe Award for “Sex and the City” (1998)

“I tell my friends married life is boring, but that’s just a fun thing to say to make single people feel better.”

“Sarah Jessica is fine, Sarah, SJP, SJ, hey you, anything.” [on how to address her]

“The hardest part of leaving the show [“Sex and the City” (1998)] was this endless gypsy-like life that I’m back into, where it’s like being the new kid in school all the time, which for some people is very easy but for me is not. I don’t really like change, and I would like everything to be the same constantly, except that I love being terrified.”

“Celebrity and the media are reliant on each other – always have been – but we have lost the elegance in that relationship, somehow.”

“Fashion is a part of my work. I feel a responsibility to be presentable, to dress up if the occasion calls for it. But, really, fashion does not play that big a role in my life these days.”

“One of the things that’s great about New York is that it is not a one-industry town. It has education, academia, the service industry, arts, publishing, theater, politics, fashion, finance, as well as movie-making. There are so many people who are cogs in the great wheel of the city that a less bright light is shone on our lives. It still exists – there are always paparazzi at our house – but being a public person feels less like a business than it does in LA. And you have to approach it differently. I can’t hide behind gates, or in a car, but if I can get a few yards from my front door, I can still get lost in a crowd. I am always moments, just moments, from obscurity on a crowded street in New York.”

“I get the feeling people are disappointed with me because I don’t have the answers for them. I have to remind them that I don’t have a Ph.D. in sex or counseling.

Regarding her new Steve & Barry line of affordable conservative womenswear: “There’s not going to be any inappropriate midriff showing, regardless of your age. I really don’t care for it. I feel like, as a culture, we have seen enough damage done by it. It’s provocative in a way that I just don’t feel comfortable with.”

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